Bowel Cancer Improvement Programme

More than 1300 people die from bowel cancer in Yorkshire every year. We are committed to reducing this figure by implementing a gold standard of bowel cancer care, which is accessible regardless of where treatment is received in our region.

 

What Is the Bowel Cancer Improvement Programme?

The way hospitals treat bowel cancer varies significantly across Yorkshire. The Bowel Cancer Improvement Programme, funded by Yorkshire Cancer Research, assesses these differences and works with individual hospitals to specifically address any areas of weakness. It also seeks to implement and accelerate the introduction of the latest advances.

We are in pursuit of the gold-standard for bowel cancer treatment throughout Yorkshire. By improving outcomes for people with bowel cancer, this study could save as many as 300 lives each year.
 

Why Is This Study Needed?

While new cancer treatments are vital, ensuring everyone receives the same level of high-quality care is also hugely important. This ten-year study is designed to understand where differences in treatment occur, which treatments give the best results and how they can be delivered across the region. The research team analyses existing NHS data and uses additional information received from people with bowel cancer who have been cared for by NHS Trusts across the region. 

It is essential that hospitals in Yorkshire are able to learn from each other and adopt the most successful ways of working so that areas for improvement can be identified and the necessary changes implemented. 

How Will The Study Benefit People In Yorkshire?

Currently, there is a 'postcode lottery' in terms of treatment for bowel cancer. Yorkshire Cancer Research believes that, regardless of where someone lives in Yorkshire, they should be able to access the very best treatment. This study aims to make this a reality by working closely with doctors and people receiving treatment to understand where the biggest issues are and to take steps to tackle these at a local level. Ultimately, this will result in treatment improvements and a greater likelihood of all bowel cancer patients receiving gold standard care, irrespective of where they live and where they are treated.

 

“Before my experience with cancer, I thought everyone got the same treatment across the country – then I found out they don’t even get the same treatment across Yorkshire. I wanted to contribute towards the ‘levelling up’ agenda to reduce inequalities and ensure everyone receives gold-standard treatment.”

Barbara Hibbert – Bowel Cancer patient
 

Research Programme:
Bowel Cancer Improvement Programme

Researcher:
Professor Philip Quirke – University of Leeds

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